subscription box

Craftiosity – Marbled Candle Holder

I haven’t done any marbling for a little while so I was quite excited about the Craftiosity marbled candle holder kit! I thought it was a really clever idea to add a unique design to a something that would make a great centrepiece for a table or mantelpiece.

Included in the kit was:

  • Wooden candle holder
  • White acrylic paint
  • Paint brush
  • Marbling tray
  • Marbling inks x2 (black and blue)
  • Disposable gloves

The first step was to paint the candle holder with the white acrylic paint to act as a base for the ink and also to be the third colour of the marbling pattern. The actual making time for this project is actually quite quick but there is quite a bit of drying time involved too. The instructions said that the paint would be dry after 30 minutes, but I actually left mine overnight because I had other jobs to get on with, which made it quite a good project to fit in between other things. I was also painting another project at the same time (see my next blog post!) so it was quite good to have this to alternate with!

Once the paint was dry it was time to get marbling. Using the marbling tray filled two thirds with water you could create your design using drops of the inks. I actually added some extra drops after I swirled my inks with the end of the paint brush but I think I used too much in the end because my finished candle holder took a very long time to dry. Restraint is definitely key here and I think it would still have made a nice pattern, I was just a bit over enthusiastic!

After dunking both sides into the marble pattern on the surface of the water and making sure that all the sides of the candle holder were covered and that it didn’t touch the bottom of the tray, all that was left to do was to let it dry. As I mentioned, mine took a little while to dry completely, but now it is done it looks great. I love with marbling that you never quite get the same design twice so every piece is completely unique. 

I also liked the suggestion of using the inks to marble some paper as well and experimenting with different patterns. It’s always nice to have ideas of what to do with the leftover supplies from craft kits. Now I just need to buy some candles to go in my nice new holder! 

craft kit

Inner Canvas – Abstractus

As you probably know I am currently subscribed to quite a few monthly craft boxes and have been considering cancelling some and swapping them for others to make sure I’m trying out a variety of things and not just getting stuck in a rut. It’s hard to cancel any of them though as I’m always excited to see what will come next and I do feel as though I’m sampling a good range of crafts. However, on the hunt for new craft subscription boxes I came across Inner Canvas. I had a look at the website and scrolled through the past boxes to see what kinds of things were included. Most of the crafts I had tried before, but the designs looked unique and the kits looked well curated. The thing that made me do a happy dance was that you could buy past kits on a one off basis! I love it when subscription box services do this as it means you can dip in and out of the kits without committing to a full subscription, which comes with the danger of receiving crafts you aren’t that interested in. I have several boxes stacked up down in my studio that I haven’t got around to making because I’m just not that excited about the contents.

I was attracted to Inner Canvas via Instagram where Nadia, the lady who runs the show, was posting about their latest box, an embroidery entitled ‘Abstractus’. The design is inspired by geodes and features embellishments of Czech glass beads and Aventurine beads – a semi-precious gemstone.  

Included in the kit was:

  • Embroidery hoop
  • Aventurine gemstones
  • Czech glass beads
  • Calico fabric
  • Embroidery thread
  • Embroidery needle
  • Beading needle
  • Carbon paper
  • Paper template
  • Metal keyring blank
  • Metal hook (for hanging embroidery)
  • Care package (tealights and a tea bag)

Also included was a ‘Therapist Approved’ journal that included some self-reflective exercises to help reduce anxiety and improve the mindfulness associated with crafting and creativity. I haven’t had a chance to complete any of the exercises yet (to be honest I find crafting mindful enough), but they do look good and a journal is included with every kit.

The instructions that came with the kit were quite basic, just a paper template for transferring the design over to the fabric using the carbon paper and a photograph of the finished piece with a key to show which stitch and colour embroidery thread, or beads should go in which section. The photograph was really clear and easy to use. More detailed instructions were provided via a video link sent in an email. I was really impressed with the video, the steps were demonstrated well and the voiceover was well-paced and easy to understand. Although I already know how to do the two stitches I thought the step-by-step instructions showed how to do them both clearly, especially the two options for getting the satin stitch to go round a curve, which is sometimes tricky for beginners to get to grips with. 

There was a second instructional video for the bonus keyring project that was just as well created as the main video. The keyring was made first so you could ensure you would have enough fabric for both projects and it was nice to have a practice go at the satin stitch and attaching the beads before moving onto the main one.

I thought the design of the embroidery was really unique and I liked how you could really feel where the inspiration came from. I was also impressed at how what is a fairly simple design using only two stitches and the addition of the beads can have such an impact as a finished piece. It just goes to show that less definitely can be more!

I thoroughly enjoyed this craft kit and am keen to see what projects Inner Canvas bring out in the future. I will definitely be keeping an eye on their Instagram feed and will be ordering any kits that look exciting. I have already ordered another of their past kits, the Abstract Air Dry Clay Ceramic kit. I’m hoping to get the chance to have a play around with that one very soon as it’s been a while since I did any clay work and I’m hoping that I will enjoy it as much as I have enjoyed this one.

subscription box

Craft Box Club – Macrame Semilunar

Quite a quick craft this week from Craft Box Club – a macrame semilunar with a bonus keyring project. I’m really glad I’ve done some macrame recently, especially learning the double half hitch which made up the main body of this project!

Included in the box was:

  • Macrame twine – white
  • Macrame twine – forest green
  • Wooden dowel
  • Macrame comb
  • Keyring clip

The instructions say you will also need scissors but you will need a length of string as well to hang the dowel from. The instruction video for this one is great. All the knots are shown slowly and repeated so that you can see them clearly. I paused and rewound the video several times to make sure I was doing it correctly. I think for this project the video was definitely better than the pictures, although the pictures were still useful. With macrame I much prefer to see the knot being created, rather than just a picture or description. It helps me to understand the structure of the knot a lot better.

Both the projects were really quick to complete. The semilunar was much smaller than I thought it was going to be from the pictures I had seen prior to receiving the kit, but I think that was a good thing because it wasn’t too repetitive and I quite enjoyed making something fairly small for a change! 

I thought the addition of the keyring was great too. It was a good chance to use a couple more different knots; a square knot and a gathering knot. There was a separate instructional video for this project and again was clear and slow enough that you could craft along with it.

Although it’s nice to get involved in a longer project I do enjoy completing something a little quicker every now and then. It gives a nice sense of achievement and satisfaction for only a couple of hours of work.

craft kit

Wild Floss Embroidery

I’m always on the look out for new craft kits to try and I actually saw this Wild Floss embroidery kit advertised on Facebook. I took a look at their Instagram account and Etsy shop and thought that the kits looked really different to the usual embroidery kits that I’ve seen.

The kit includes:

  • 6” wooden embroidery hoop
  • Fabric
  • Needle
  • Needle threader
  • Variety of yarns
  • Water soluble fabric

I actually didn’t realise that there was a sheet of water soluble fabric at first because it was all wrapped up inside the embroidery fabric. In the end I didn’t use it as it felt a bit plasticky and I thought it would annoy me as I stitched through it. I stuck to the age old technique of tracing the design onto the fabric by holding it up to a window to help the design show through. I don’t have a water soluble pen as the instructions suggested using so I used a pencil. The pencil didn’t show up that well on the fabric so after I made the first tracing I went over it back at the table where I could press more heavily with my pencil and used the paper template as a guide to fill in the blanks myself.

There were instructions for four types of stitches; running stitch, straight/satin stitch, seed stitch, and French knots. I thought the diagrams and descriptions for each stitch were well written and easy to follow. However, I wasn’t really sure why the seed stitch instructions were there as it wasn’t used at all in the design and to create the same effect as the example photo I actually used back stitch rather than running stitch for some of the sections. I did really like the technique for finishing the hoop off at the back. I have never seen it done like this before. The messy back was hidden by layering another piece of fabric behind the main fabric before securing them both in the hoop and then glueing it all in place at the back. It gives it a very tidy, finished look.

Although there were lots of different types of yarn included in the kit, I did feel as though I had to be a bit careful which ones I used for various sections as there were only a couple of strands of each type included and I didn’t want to run out halfway through a section. That did actually happen in one of the French knot sections, but it doesn’t really matter because nobody would know once it is finished. I think that is the beauty of a kit like this. Although there is a design and a pattern, you don’t necessarily need to follow that pattern if you don’t want to. It allows for creativity and freedom to make something completely unique. 

I was attracted to this kit because of the different textures and types of yarn used to complete the design. I really like tactile art pieces, particularly textiles, that make the viewer want to touch them. With this piece I also really like how the thicker yarns give the design differing heights as well. My favourite part is the section that looks a bit like cauliflower! 

I don’t think I would recommend this kit to a beginner sewer, but I would definitely recommend it to a more experienced embroiderer who was looking to expand their creativity and try out familiar stitches with new materials. I’m very pleased with my finished piece, it makes me think of a coral reef where lots of strange sea creatures are lurking!

subscription box

Craftiosity – Embroidered Moon Tea Towel

Back to embroidery for me this week with the moon tea towel from Craftiosity. I really like the idea behind the design of this embroidery of the waxing moon representing a period of building energy and achieving goals. Nice to have a reminder of this in the kitchen whilst I’m doing the washing up!

Included in the kit was:

  • Embroidery hoop
  • Cotton tea towel
  • Embroidery thread x4 (dark grey, mid blue, light blue, dusky pink)
  • Needle
  • Paper template
  • Inspirational postcards

The template was used to trace the design lightly onto the tea towel using a pencil and a dotted line rather than a solid line for the clouds as they wouldn’t be filled in completely. The instructions said to only trace the clouds first and then put the outline of the moon and foliage in later, but I doubted my ability to line up the pattern again so I just traced it all at once!

I really liked the use of the different stitches and coloured thread to fill the clouds. It was quite repetitive doing the seed stitch, cross stitch and French knots, but in a mindful and meditative way. I tied off the thread after doing each little grey star as I didn’t want to waste the thread and I didn’t want the stitches on the back to show through to the front. 

The moon was stitched in satin stitch using all six strands of the thread and the leaves were meant to be the same, but I felt as though I didn’t have enough left to complete them so I changed to only using three strands for the leaves. As the area of the leaves was a lot smaller than the moon it didn’t really make a difference to the overall look. 

I’m looking forward to using this and having it hanging in my kitchen, inspiring me to grow and work towards me goals!

subscription box

Makerly – Soap and Sugar Scrub

I always think that soap making will be complicated even though I’ve done it before, but it’s actually so easy as this month’s Makerly box has proved to me once again! The kit was to make mini soaps and sugar scrubs flavoured with lavender and Chai tea.

Included in the kit was:

  • Melt and pour soap base
  • Coconut oil
  • White sugar
  • Brown sugar
  • Lavender
  • Chai teabags
  • Lavender essential oil
  • Plastic moulds
  • Gift tags
  • String

I made the soap first, melting it in the microwave in short bursts until it was completely runny. I actually had to reheat it because I had trouble taking the lid off the essential oil and it started to congeal! The instructions did say to work fast and I should have prepped everything in advance, but it did take me by surprise just how quickly it started to set. I used the lavender oil and flowers for the first batch of soap and the Chai tea for the second batch. I was expecting it to fill all the moulds as shown in the picture, but mine mixture didn’t quite stretch that far.

Conversely there was so much sugar scrub mixture that I had to set it in several batches! I made up the mixture whilst the soap was setting in the fridge, which only took about 15 minutes. I melted the coconut oil in the microwave and mixed it with both sugars along with the lavender for the first batch and the tea for the second batch. This took me longer than I expected. There was so much of each mixture that in total I filled, set, and emptied the moulds three times!

The soap base and coconut oil came in tins which could then be repurposed as gift boxes for the bath time treats, using the gift tags and string to label them. The sugar scrubs definitely need to be stored in a cool place as the coconut oil does have a tendency to melt if it gets too warm. I left some of them in front of a window whilst I was waiting for the others to set and the sun coming through caused them to start to losing their shape and disintegrate a bit, so take care with your sugar scrub storage!

Although I am more drawn towards textile and embroidery based crafts it is always fun to do something a little different for a change. One thing I’ve found about the Makerly craft subscription is that the projects nearly always push me to try something new that is out of my crafting comfort zone, so whilst producing soap and sugar scrubs may not become something I will make a regular habit of I enjoyed my morning dabbling in toiletries!

subscription box

MakeBox – Beatrix Bunny Doll

I’ve been really looking forward to this month’s MakeBox (https://www.makebox.co/), the Beatrix Bunny Doll, not only because I love sewing but also because it has an Easter feel to it and I love this time of year! I love all the egg, chick and bunny themed craft projects, along with that feeling of Spring in the air and the sense of hope and positivity it brings, especially this year. I was particularly interested in this box because, whilst I love sewing, it is always nice to have a go at a different kind of sewing aside from embroidery for a change. I did make the Sugar Plum Fairy heirloom style doll from MakeBox a couple of Christmases ago (see my blog on it here) and this was very similar in style.

Included in the box was:

  • Cream poly cotton
  • Vintage floral linen
  • Pink linen
  • Embroidery threads (black and pink)
  • Sewing thread
  • Stuffing
  • Elastic
  • Needles
  • Pins

Before receiving the kit, MakeBox emailed the subscribers with a choice of box, Beatrix Bunny (which I chose) or Bobby Bunny. Each came with a different vintage fabric to make the ears and outfit. The shirt style was different for each of them as well. Since sending out the subscription boxes MakeBox have also introduced Betsy Bunny who is available to buy in their online shop. I actually think I might have chosen Betsy if she had been included in the original choice! 

The first step was to cut out all the pattern pieces from paper and draw them onto the fabric. For some of the pieces it was important to remember to flip them over to make an opposite; to create a left and a right ear for example. The vintage fabric was also quite limited to so you had to lay out the pattern pieces carefully, ensuring that you still had a good seam allowance around each piece.

The sewing began with the head, which was definitely the most complicated part. The instructions said you could either hand sew or machine sew. I thought machine sewing would be quicker but sheer laziness stopped me from getting my sewing machine out (!) so I decided to hand sew it and actually, I’m glad I did. Machine sewing would have been a lot faster for parts of it, but there were some parts that were at such an awkward angle and had so many pins in to keep it in place that I definitely would have struggled with the machine. 

Making the head felt a lot like piecing a jigsaw puzzle together, but after constructing it all and adding the eyes and nose with the embroidery thread I felt really proud of myself!

Moving on to the body was a lot more straightforward. The arms and legs were easy to sew around, although they took me a little while to turn out. I used a pencil to help push the stuffing down to make sure they were well filled. Attaching the arms and legs to the body was a little tricky but only because the limbs made it bulky to sew. The instructions were a little vague in places, like saying to pin the body into place but not actually saying to sew it, however the step-by-step photographs were pretty clear to follow. Once the bottom floral piece had been sewn on the bunny could then be stuffed. I used rice to stuff the bottom so that she sits up nicely. The instructions also suggest lentils could be used as an alternative. The rest of the body was stuffed with toy stuffing like the limbs and head.

Sewing the body to the head was by far the most difficult part. You had to do a whip stitch with the seam allowance tucked inside, add to this the difficult angle and my neckline ended up looking a bit messy. I actually unpicked my first attempt and started again as it was so bad! My second attempt was a little better but still not my finest sewing!

Lastly it was time to make the clothes. This was the part I was most looking forward to. The bloomers were cut out of the pink linen, hemmed and sewn together before sewing elastic into the waistband and legs. The pinafore top was slightly more complicated and I’m glad I measured it around the body before sewing up the seam allowances because it was a very tight fit so I adjusted it to have less seam allowance, but still have a tidy finish. The flounces were fun to do, although my thumb was glad when they were done after pushing the needle through so many layers of material! I decided to alter the way the straps were attached to the top. In the instructions they are attached to the top of the blouse and just tied around the neck, but I thought this looked a bit messy, so I attached them to the side of the neckline and then sewed them in place to the back of the blouse like proper straps. It means my messy head attachment is more visible, but I think it gives it a more finished look overall.

I’m very proud of my finished Beatrix Bunny. She was quite a labour intensive project and took me a long time to complete, but the end result is a lovely toy. Now I just have to decide whether to keep her or give her away!

subscription box

Makerly – Latch Hook Wall Hanging

This latch hook wall hanging box from Makerly (https://www.makerlycrafts.com/) actually arrived in December, but I just did not have the time to squeeze any more crafts in before Christmas! I saved this one and have been doing it at a fairly leisurely pace over the last week or so. I’ve been wanting to learn latch hook for a while, I love the soft fluffy result, so I was quite excited when I opened this box up.

Included in the kit was:

  • Latch hook
  • Canvas
  • Dowel
  • Chunky wool
  • Pattern
  • Blank pattern sheet

The instructions were really easy to follow, although it did take me a few goes to get the hang of the latch hook tool, mainly I think because I had to translate it to left-handed, which I always find quite tricky. It was definitely worth the practice on a spare bit of canvas though. I decided to follow the pattern provided as I’ve never done this technique before, but now I am more confident with it I might use the spare canvas and the blank pattern sheet to create my own.

I have to say that this is a labour intensive craft! There is quite a lot of prep work, cutting all the lengths of wool before you start, and quite a lot of counting involved. The hooking itself is quite slow work, although I would imagine that the more you do, the quicker you get. I sat up at the dining table to do mine and I think I would have struggled doing it on the sofa with nothing to lean against, and I did find it gave me a bit of a backache leaning over it as I worked, which is why I took my time with this one, doing small sections at a time.

As I was working I was really worried that my pattern wouldn’t show through very well, it looked much messier than the picture and the strands of wool seemed to have a mind of their own, but as soon as I started trimming it down (the most satisfying bit) and getting rid of the uneven ends, it really started to pop out. I did have to spend some time rearranging some of the strands to get them to sit in the right place to neaten up some of the lines.

I’d actually quite like to turn it into a cushion as it is soft! I’m supposed to be doing an online latch hook workshop later in January, so it was a bit of a surprise that this kit came through the door first! I’m looking forward to seeing if there are any different tips, tricks and techniques to learn, and am looking forward to having another go at this craft.

subscription box

Craft Box Club – Poms & Tassels

More wreaths! This time from Craft Box Club (https://craftboxclub.co.uk/) and although they are from December and were sent out as a Christmas box, I think these ones can probably stay up all year round as they aren’t too festive!

Included in the box was:

  • Balls of yarn x4 (grey, pink, white x2)
  • Embroidery hoop
  • Glue
  • Corks x2
  • Wooden stars x2
  • Wooden buttons x6
  • Lolly stick
  • Paper template
  • Dragonfly teabags x2

The link for the how-to video guide was also included along with some top tips and a lovely Christmas message from Adam. As usual I found the video easy to follow and each step was clearly demonstrated. The first thing to do was to glue the buttons and stars onto pieces of cork ready for attaching to the hoop at the end of the project. I thought the cork was going to be quite difficult to cut, but actually I just sliced them up with a bread knife! This is done first as the glue takes a little while to dry and you can be getting on with your tassels and pom-poms in the meantime.

This kit really appealed to me as I am a pom-pom lover! I feel like I’ve become well versed in pom-pom making this year. I made a pom-pom wreath back in April and more recently did a workshop using the Loome tool, and now this. Each one has used a slightly different method to create the pom-poms. For this project we used quite an old fashioned method with two pieces of card cut into circles and the yarn wound around. I always find this method quite tricky as you need about four hands to cut the yarn and tie the string around the middle and hold everything in place at the same time! I did accidentally hack my card template up a bit when I was cutting the yarn open, but it survived long enough to make three pom-poms! If I was using this method again I think I would use some thicker card, maybe cut the shapes out of the box it came in instead.

The tassels were really easy to make and were created around your hand, no special equipment required at all. I haven’t made tassels very often and was very pleased with the result as they all came out the same size!

I really like the use of the embroidery hoop to create the two wreaths as it felt as though you were getting two for the price of one! The larger hoop was wrapped in yarn, leaving gaps for the buttons and stars to be glued on. The most difficult part of this kit was having the patience to wait for the glue to dry before tying on the tassels and pom-poms to complete the wreaths!

subscription box

Craftiosity – Winter Felt Wreath

I had so much crafting to do before Christmas that I just couldn’t fit it all in! As we are still in the ‘Christmas period’ I think it’s ok to still be posting wreaths, especially one as nice as this from the December Craftiosity box (https://craftiosity.co.uk/).

Included in the box was:

  • Felt sheets x4 (orange, ivory, light green, dark green)
  • Embroidery thread x4 (orange, green, white, gold)
  • Metal wreath base
  • Needle
  • Paper template
  • Christmas gift of gold flecked baker’s twine

Wreaths, fruit, felt and embroidery seem to be very much the trend of the season, based on what I’ve been making over the last few weeks and this snowberry and orange slice wreath certainly fits the bill. Ever since I saw this kit on Instagram I’ve been looking forward to making the orange slices! The kit was very straightforward to put together, and each step had some great techniques to try. I thought that wrapping the metal hoop in strips of felt to attach the components to was a great idea, and I particularly liked creating the snowberries using a running stitch to gather the circle of felt together. Filling them with off-cuts of the felt was a neat way to use up the scraps and create less waste.

The orange slices were the most time-consuming part. The segments were created using long and short stitch and there were three slices to do, with six segments on each. I’m not really sure how long they took me as I sat and did them in front of the TV, but I do know that I love the result! My only issue was that I ran out of embroidery thread after making only two of the slices. I’m not sure why as I followed the instructions, but I thought I wouldn’t be able to finish the third slice. I looked into buying the thread online, which was easy enough to find on Love Crafts (https://www.lovecrafts.com/en-gb/), but before I bought it I decided to check in my sewing box. I have done a lot of kits and have a lot of leftover thread so I rummaged through and miraculously found a skein that was almost identical in colour to the original thread! It is ever so slightly lighter, but I don’t think it notices at all now that they are all attached the to hoop. Once I’d finished the final slice with my found thread I then added the finishing gold touches.

Once I had all the components and the hoop prepared I could then decide on the placement and sew it all together. Although this wreath didn’t quite get made in time for this Christmas I will look forward to hanging it up in my home next year!