craft kit

Cosy Craft Club – Spring Craft Box

At the beginning of March Cosy Craft Club announced their Spring craft boxes filled with various kits from a range of exciting designer-makers. I saw it first on Instagram, but then signed up to the newsletter to make sure I was first in line for one of the boxes as they sell out quick! There were two choices; the large box containing six mini craft kits for £65, or the small box containing three mini craft kits for £35.

Each kit was designed by a different maker and there was a range of crafts included so you could try your hand a several different things. I got the large kit in order to try out as much as possible and below is a round up of each of the crafts.

From The Wood Cottage Crafts was a hanging heart kit. It contained all the materials you needed to make three stuffed fabric heart shapes which could them be attached to a strip of bias binding to create bunting or could be left separate as individual decorations to hang around the house or give as gifts. I hand stitched mine, but the heart shapes could easily have been machine stitched if that’s more your thing, and the whole project was really quick to complete. It took me less than two hours, but probably would have been quicker had I used the sewing machine. I really liked the addition of the cute little heart buttons to embellish the fabric hearts. The instructions were very simple and easy to follow.

The next kit was a felt bumblebee brooch from Hawthorn Handmade. This kit was a little more time consuming, but worth spending the time on as the result is a gorgeous embroidered felt brooch, which feels very Spring-like indeed! Although I did attach the brooch back in the end, as I was sewing I was tempted to leave it off as I thought it would make a great patch for a bag or denim jacket as well. There was a booklet included in the kit filled with handy tips and instructions for working with felt as well as great diagrams of all the stitches you would need. The instructions specific to this kit were well laid out with good diagrams for the placement of all the pieces and the thread colour you would need, along with a clear photograph of the finished product, which I always find helpful.

There was a paper forget-me-not flowers kit from Suzi McLaughlin. Sometimes I find paper craft a little fiddly, but the most difficult part of this kit was making the coils for the centre of the flowers. It was a great kit for a beginner to paper crafting with a single page of instruction that were mostly photos showing what to do, so not too intimidating! Each step was very simple, but the finished look was very effective.

The other paper craft kit included in the box was card making from Okey Dokey Design. I found this really fun. There were no instructions included and other than a postcard with a photo of some finished cards on there was nothing prescriptive about the kit at all, the only limit is your own creativity! At first this threw me off as I am so used to doing kits with very specific instructions, but there was something quite liberating and childlike just being given some materials and allowed to play with them as you wished. Included in the kit was five blank cards, various patterned papers, paper flower shapes, wooden flower shapes, the cutest little wooden bees, and some twine. I decided to make some Easter cards as it is the season and then some other more generic cards that could be used for other occasions like birthdays.

By far the hardest kit for me was the baby bunny felting from The Crafty Kit Company. If you have read my blog before you will know that felting is probably my least favourite craft! Although I’m not a huge fan I still gave it a go and thanks to the thorough instructions and great step-by-step photos I was actually pretty pleased with my end product. It doesn’t look too far off the photos and I’m sure with practice I could get it even better. There was loads of wool included in the kit so I probably could have made at least one more bunny, although there was only one set of eyes so there might have to have been some improvisation. The time for this kit was two hours, but it definitely took me longer than this, especially as I had to do some quite drastic reshaping about halfway through to stop it looking like a sheep!

Lastly there was a mosaic kit from Mosaics by Sadie. Included in this was the wooden bird shape, a range of mosaic pieces including some china and a pre-cut wing shape, glue, grout powder, a hook to attach to the back, and a cocktail stick to help move the pieces around, although I ended up using tweezers. There was a photo of a design included, but there were enough mosaic pieces included that you could play around with your own design. There weren’t any photographic instructions, but the written instructions were so detailed that pictures weren’t needed. Although the active making time on this kit wasn’t that long, there was a lot of drying time required so it was not a project you could complete in a day.

I really enjoyed this bumper crafting box with so many different crafts to try. You often get these kinds of collaborative kits around Christmas, but I always run out of time to complete them as it’s such a busy period, so it was nice to have something like this to complete at leisure. Although I’ve finished them all in time for Easter we still have plenty of spring left to enjoy these themed crafts.

craft kit

Cosy Craft Club – Black Work Mandala Succulents

This black work embroidery kit is another one I purchased as a one-off through Cosy Craft Club (who also do subscriptions), put together by Purple Rose Embroidery. Black work is a counted form of embroidery using Aida fabric and geometric patterns to build up the design, in this case a mandala style succulent. Although traditionally worked in black thread other colours can be used and the term is nowadays used to refer to the technique, rather than the colour of thread.

Included in the kit was:

  • Aida fabric
  • Wooden embroidery hoop
  • Needles x2
  • Black embroidery thread
  • Gold embroidery thread
  • Magnetic needle minder

The project was worked in four stages; the outline, the geometric designs, the gold highlights, and the background. I’ve been keen to try this technique for a while as I’ve seen a lot of examples of it on social media. The results look incredibly intricate, however once you break them down to their component parts the process is actually fairly simple. The ‘cheat sheet’ included in the instructions does a good job of explaining how to start, the basic stitch you will need, and breaking down the patterns into basic shapes. 

There are three designs included in the instructions for a small, medium and large design. I decided to do the large one as the embroidery hoop was big enough and I like to give myself a challenge! Although the design looks great in just black I really liked the addition of the gold highlights and background design. They really bring the piece to life and add a touch of luxury.

The only negatives in this kit for me were a lack of instructions on how to finish a hoop. I already know how to do this, but this kit would be achievable for a less experienced embroiderer so it would be helpful to have some details about finishing the hoop at the back, especially given the amount of work put into the design. The other thing that would have been helpful is a photograph of the finished design. The template obviously showed all the stitches, but sometimes its good to have a photo for reference too. 

This is not a quick craft. Finishing this hoop took me a long time. I would recommend good lighting, good eyesight and a lot of patience for this type of embroidery. The geometric designs are made up of very small stitches and worked in a single strand of thread. Although it took a long time to complete I did really enjoy doing it and I’m really proud of the finished piece as I put so much hard work into it.   

craft kit · subscription box

Cosy Craft Club – Alice and Stars Enamel Jewellery

I heard about Cosy Craft Club on Instagram and started following them as I liked the look of their kits. They do offer a monthly subscription, but I decided to buy a couple of kits as a one off to get a feel for their style. It looks as though Cosy Craft Club collaborates with a maker each month to put a kit together. The first kit I’ve tried is the current kit for this month – enamel jewellery, created by Alice and Stars. I was really excited about this as I’ve done enamelling before as part of my jewellery diploma, but had got it into my head that you needed a kiln. It turns out that this is not the case and all that’s required is a normal kitchen oven!

Included in the kit was:

  • Enamelling powder x5 (green, blue, white, pink, red)
  • Wooden spatula
  • Bunting flag copper blanks x5
  • Round disc steel blank
  • Sieve
  • Chain
  • Jump rings
  • Clasps

I was amazed at how quick and easy this craft was to do, with instant results. The enamelling part was so quick, using the wooden spatula to transfer the powder into the sieve and then creating a nice even layer of powder on the blanks. I liked how easy it was to create interesting effects as well like an ombré. I also played around with using paper to mask areas of the blanks to create lines, but I enjoyed the ombré too much to keep them like that! Once the designs were done they only needed ten minutes maximum in the oven.

The second part of the kit was to turn the enamelled pieces into jewellery. There was enough chain, jump rings and clasps to make a necklace with the bunting and a bracelet with the disc. The instructions for both parts of the kit were easy to follow. There weren’t any pictures of the process included, however I didn’t find this a problem. On Cosy Craft Club’s Instagram there were plenty of videos and pictures showing the process and ideas for designs.

There are lots of kits available on the website covering a range of crafts. The main kits cost between £24-£30, although there are some mini kits available for less. The monthly subscription is £24 and it looks as though you would get a good variety of crafts coming through your door each month.